Review: The Lost Coast by Jane Kindred

December 12, 2015 Review 2

Review: The Lost Coast by Jane Kindred

SOME HISTORIES SHOULD STAY LOST. ESPECIALLY THOSE WRITTEN IN BLOOD.

The only things Millie Lang’s mother gave her were third-degree burns, and a name Millie refuses to use. Abandoned as an infant, Millie grew up as “the girl with the scars”, shunted from one foster family to the next.

Before she met Lukas Strand, she’d never understood what “home” meant. Then Lukas disappeared without a word. Eight years later, Millie is secure in the life she’s built as a physical therapist. Until she gets a letter from a mysterious stranger who knows her real name.

From the moment she arrives at the sprawling vineyard manor on California’s Lost Coast to work with the owner’s young son, she begins to doubt her secret benefactor’s motives. The vineyard is known as The Strand—and Lukas is her patient’s father.

As Millie delves into the tangled threads of their family histories, she realizes the fire that scarred her may not have been an accident—and Lukas’s son is in danger. Unless she survives long enough to unearth the key to some very uncomfortable truths…

Warning: Contains a vineyard owner whose family tree may not have the ideal number of branches, and a woman who is about to discover the magic hidden in her own DNA. May cause unsettling feelings of creeping anxiety and a sudden urge to make bad puns about wood.

Title: The Lost Coast
Author: Jane Kindred
Published by Samhain Publishing
Source: Author
Published: December 15, 2015
Genres: Drama, Paranormal
Pages: 271
See the title at Goodreads
Purchase your copy: Amazon
Visit the Author's Website

Stars: four-stars
Flames: three-flames
I received this book for free from the Publisher or Author in exchange for an honest review, or I purchased it with my own funds. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
300 Review

The Lost Coast is just one of the books that have you scratching your head. It starts out very innocent, moves into the odd and comes out with a what did I just read.

Millie was burned and abandoned as in infant. Growing up known as the girl with scars, she is shuffled from one foster care after another. She’s an adult now and has become a physical therapist. Her life is as normal as she can have it until she receives a job offer help a child from a mysterious stranger who knows her real name and who knows what else. Having recently lost her own job, she decides to drive out to check out the job.

I don’t know how to describe The Lost Coast other than to say it was all very strange. Let’s start with Millie. I liked her. She had a hard life growing up but she seems to be sanding pretty well on her own two feet. Lukas, was a mixed bag. Less than loving about how he treats his son I kind of hated him, but there was such a odd mystery around him. The whole story had this odd mixed feel to it. Who was innocent, and who was not had me guessing the whole way through. Millie keeps getting these odd texts from someone who knows secrets about her had me trying to puzzle out this book every time one came through. I knew The Lost Coast took a sharp turn into crazy town when Millie receives a box of letters. A warning and a spoiler: If you have a problem with incest this is not the book for you. Just putting that out there now.

I’m not going into much further details about this book other than to say I had a hard time putting it down. Lots of twisty plots, overly polite smiling characters (You know the ones that make you back up slowly while mentally you’re screaming) and a supernatural shocker that, well, I read a lot of PNRs but that was just something else. If a strange mystery with a paranormal twist is something that appeals to you, then The Lost Coast by Jane Kindred is right up your alley.

The Lost Coast

2 Responses to “Review: The Lost Coast by Jane Kindred”

  1. Jean Moretto

    Well you can consider this cat killed! Your review has me biting at the bit to get my hands on it. I love a good mystery. (And twists that keep me from guessing the end at the beginning.) As far as incest goes we have to be a little more tolerant in this day and time. I would not choose it but with the amount of affairs, “donations” and adoptions. It can be difficult to not be “related” to someone you meet. That being said, I can’t wait to read this book! Thank you.